The Max ROACH 4 – Plays Charlie Parker 1958

The Max ROACH 4 – Plays Charlie Parker 1958
1995 Issue.

Jazz

All songs written by Charlie Parker except “Raoul” (Maxwell Lemuel “Max” Roach), “This Time The Dream’s On Me” (Harold Arlen/John Herndon “Johnny” Mercer), “Tune-Up” (Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson) and “Anthropology” (John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie/Charlie Parker).

The music on this CD finds drummer Max Roach for the first time dropping the piano out of his quintet and performing with a pianoless quartet. With the departure of Sonny Rollins (who is replaced on three songs apiece by either Hank Mobley or George Coleman), Roach’s group (which also featured trumpeter Kenny Dorham and either George Morrow or Nelson Boyd on bass) was temporarily without any major innovators (outside of the leader). So it was perfectly fitting that Roach would look backwards and perform six of Charlie Parker’s compositions. Highlighted by “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation” and “Ko Ko,” this set is generally fine although the lack of a piano is really felt on some of this material. ~ Scott Yanow

Recorded in New York on December 20 & 23, 1957 and April 11, 1958. Originally released as THE MAX ROACH 4 PLAYS CHARLIE PARKER on EmArcy (SR 80019) and as MAX ROACH + 4 & MORE on Mercury (Japan) (195J-39). Includes liner notes by Brian Priestly and original release liner notes by Dom Cerulli.
**
The music on this CD finds drummer Max Roach for the first time dropping the piano out of his quintet and performing with a pianoless quartet. With the departure of Sonny Rollins (who is replaced on three songs apiece by either Hank Mobley or George Coleman), Roach’s group (which also featured trumpeter Kenny Dorham and either George Morrow or Nelson Boyd on bass) was temporarily without any major innovators (outside of the leader). So it was perfectly fitting that Roach would look backwards and perform six of Charlie Parker’s compositions. Highlighted by “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation” and “Ko Ko,” this set is generally fine although the lack of a piano is really felt on some of this material.
By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
With the break-up of the Clifford Brown-Max Roach Quintet, the legendary drummer would take some curious, experimental paths toward greater musical freedom, chief among them the elimination of a pianist or chordal instrument. On some of his recordings–“Max Roach at Newport” on Mercury comes to mind–he even replaced the pianist with a tuba player(!) but to less than productive or satisfying effect. Roach’s recordings from this period did not establish any vital directions in the music, nor do they hold up as well today as do the musical paths taken by Miles, Coltrane, Ornette, or Bill Evans. (Elvin Jones tried similar instrumentations beginning in the late sixties but was far more successful, to my ears, in supplying the colors and textures normally provided by the piano. Gerry Mulligan, on the other hand, always compensated for the missing piano through the polyphonic textures of a 2-3 horn frontline.)

“The Max Roach 4 Plays Charlie Parker” is not a recording I go to often, and when I do it’s for some of the inventive melodic work by Hank Mobley and George Coleman, who split the tenor sax duties on the date (unfortunately, none of the tracks includes both musicians).

If you’re a Roach addict and appreciate relatively straight-ahead jazz sans piano, this recording may hold some appeal.
Bt Samuel Chell.
**
Max Roach- (Drums),
Hank Mobley, George Coleman- (Tenor Sax),
Kenny Dorham- (Trumpet),
Nelson Boyd, George Morrow- (Bass).
**
01. Yardbird Suite
02. Confirmation
03. KoKo
04. Billie’s Bounce
05. Au Privave
06. Parker’s Mood
07. Raoul
08. This Time The Dream’s On Me
09. Tune-Up
10. Anthropology (Thriving On A Riff)
**


NoPassword
*
DLink
*
Please Donate

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: