Archive for the Chris Thomas KING Category

Chris Thomas KING – Red Mud Sessions 1998

Posted in BLUES, Chris Thomas KING on December 23, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Chris Thomas KING – Red Mud Sessions 1998

Blues

Red Mud the CD by Chris Thomas King demonstrates why he is a rising new star of the blues. Although he is neither young or new at thirty eight and having put in his apprenticeship touring with his father Tabby Thomas. During this time he certainly developed a good feel for the spirit of the blues and aptly demonstrates this on the cd. King is both a skillful guitarist and songwriter. On the cd of the fourteen songs, nine are originals. You can definitely feel the delta ooze on the title track of Red Mud. The cuts of his fathers songs Hoodoo Party and Bus Station Blues with vocals by Tabby Thomas are wonderful.
By  Booknblueslady.
**
Red Mud Sessions is a tweaked and reordered reissue of 1998’s Red Mud, which is out of print in its original form. This version of the record omits two tracks that were a poor fit both musically and conceptually with the rest of the album, covers of songs by Chris Thomas King’s father, Tabby Thomas, “Hoodoo Party” and “Bus Station Blues,” which featured the elder Thomas on electric lead. Those two songs were entertaining enough, but in the context of Red Mud, they stuck out like a pair of cheeseburgers on a platter of ribs. Red Mud Sessions collects the rest of the album, which is a strictly acoustic solo recording of King and a battery of vintage resonator and metal-top guitars. King makes the connection plain by including solid but unexceptional versions of Son House’s “Death Letter Blues” and a pair of Robert Johnson tracks, but even the original material sounds like King is deliberately channeling the early country blues of the ’30s. It’s unsurprising that not long after this album was recorded, the formerly progressive-oriented King was tapped to play a ’30s-vintage bluesman in the film O Brother, Where Art Thou? Those who already have the original Red Mud don’t need to buy Red Mud Sessions, but it’s an enjoyable listen to anyone who liked King’s role in that film.
By Stewart Mason, All Music Guide.
**
Tabby Thomas- Guitar, Vocals,
Darryl White- Drums,
Chris Thomas King- Bass, Guitar, Harmonica, Percussion, Strings, Keyboards, Vocals, Talk Box,
David Tarantolo- Organ
**
01.Red Mud (4:09)
02.It Ain’t One Thing, It’s Two (3:58)
03.Soon This Morning Blues (3:48)
04.Come On In My Kitchen (4:23)
05.I’m On Fire (3:30)
06.Sinking Feeling (3:01)
07.Alive (3:42)
08.Dark Cloud (3:18)
09.Hoodoo Party (3:42)
10.Rambling On My Mind (3:04)
11.Wanna Die with A Smile On My Face (2:52)
12.Death Letter Blues (5:26)
13.Bus Station Blues (4:04)
14.Raining Angels (4:57)
**
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Chris Thomas KING – It's A Cold-Ass World, The Beginning 1986

Posted in BLUES, Chris Thomas KING on December 17, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Chris Thomas KING – It’s A Cold-Ass World, The Beginning 1986
2001 Issue.
Recorded at Reel To Reel Sound Factory, Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 1986

Blues

King’s debut album was released in 1986 when he was still billed as Chris Thomas. It’s quality modern blues that sounds cognizant of contemporary trends without being forced. Largely written by King, the songs are reasonably satisfying electric blues that admit some influences from modern blues-rock players, particularly Jimi Hendrix, as well as a bit of funk and rock in the rhythm. At the same time he ground out some down-home gutbucket boogie blues that would be at home in a Southern roadhouse, like “Soon This Morning” and “Take Yo Time,” and Chuck Berry-type songwriting with “Mary Jane.” The rhythm section can sound a little flat and under-recorded, but at least underproduction serves this sort of music better than overproduction does. The record was reissued on CD, billed to Chris Thomas King under the new title It’s a Cold Ass World — The Beginning, on Arhoolie in 2001, with new historical liner notes.
By Richie Unterberger, AMG.
**
This is a CD reissue of King’s debut album, released in 1986 as simply The Beginning, when he was still billed as Chris Thomas. It’s quality modern blues that sounds cognizant of contemporary trends without being forced. Largely written by King, the songs are reasonably satisfying electric blues that admit some influences from modern blues-rock players, particularly Jimi Hendrix, as well as a bit of funk and rock in the rhythm. At the same time, he grounds out some down-home gutbucket boogie blues that would be at home in a Southern roadhouse, like “Soon This Morning” and “Take Yo Time,” and Chuck Berry-type songwriting with “Mary Jane.” The rhythm section can sound a little flat and under-recorded, but at least underproduction serves this sort of music better than overproduction does.
By Richie Unterberger, AMG.

Chris Thomas King- (Vocals, Guitar);
Joe Hunter- (Bass);
Tasmmy Thomas- (Drums).
**
01. The Blues Is Back 3:37
02. Soon In The Morning 3:48
03. Cheatin’ Women Blues 4:38
04. Cocaine 6:28
05. Mary Jane 2:54
06. Take Yo Time 3:44
07. Going Home To Louisana 3:43
08. South Side Shuffle 1:44
09. You’ll Be Sorry, Babe 8:19
10. Don’t Work To Hard 3:16
**

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Chris Thomas KING – Live On Beale Street 2008

Posted in BLUES, Chris Thomas KING on November 25, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Chris Thomas KING – Live On Beale Street 2008

Blues

Beginning “I’ll Paly the Blues for You” made just sink into the mat blow.CD Perhaps then I think the CD was recorded in rare live recordings, especially without knowing of, are engaged in full performance without stint outside the calculation because reality is reversed.Chris fans, as well as those who love the dark blues is one of the natural heat definitely buy! My own stage of blues songs you want to taste the acclaimed hip-hop in particular. This 1997 record It’s a feeling that my appearance is probably most like Chris himself.
**
Chris Thomas King’s new collection features songs recorded at B. B. King’s Blues Club in Memphis on November 22, 1997, and it is a rare treat for his fans. The recordings, which were on the third floor of his New Orleans’ studio, survived the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, and include seven tracks.
The songs feature Mr. King on lead vocals, electric and acoustic guitars and harmonica, Anthony Hardesty on bass, David Tarantolo on organ, and Graylon Neal on drums. All are Mr. King’s own compositions except for the Jerry Beach number, “I’ll play the Blues for You.”
This is a well-rounded collection with selections like “C’est La Vie” and “I’ll play the Blues for You” representing his more traditional work and songs like “Blues From Da Hood” and “KKKrossroads” reflecting the style of blues, rap and hip-hop he created. He turns up the heat in his steamy renditions of “L. A. Angel” and “My Pain, Your Pleasure,” the type of numbers he does with class. Mr. King’s versatility and dynamic presentations make all these styles successful.
His guitar work on this quality recording is outstanding, particularly on songs like “I’ll Play the Blues for You,” “KKKrossroads,” and “C’est La Vie” where it has an almost haunting quality. But the most exciting aspect of the collection is the opportunity it gives listeners to go back in time and hear one of this artist’s early live performances.
This collection is a part of Mr. King’s roots and an important part of blues history. Live on Beale Street is a treasure.
By Shannon Riley.
**
Chris Thomas King- Lead Vocals, Electric, Acoustic Guitars, Harmonica,
Anthony Hardesty- Bass,
David Tarantolo- Organ,
Graylon Neal- Drums.
01. Blues Stock – Introduction 0:41
02. I’ll Play The Blues For You 5:07
03. Blues From Da Hood [Explicit] 5:04
04. My Pain, Your Pleasure 5:40
05. C’est La Vie 6:55
06. L.A. Angel 4:27
07. KkKrossroads 6:10
**

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