Archive for the Eric BIBB Category

Eric BIBB – Booker's Guitar 2010

Posted in BLUES, Eric BIBB on December 21, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Eric BIBB – Booker’s Guitar 2010

Blues

It’s Bibb’s tribute to the Delta music of Booker “Bukka” White, after a fan gave Bibb a chance to hold an old guitar that had belonged to White. He says the incident inspired him. “It all made me feel like the time was finally upon me to make a statement about my relationship with the Delta blues tradition.”
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Although inspired by pre-war Delta blues music, Eric Bibb has brought the acoustic country-blues sound into the new century withBooker’s Guitar, and as such his material has all of the gravitas and punch of the old stuff, combined with the immediacy and vitality of modern music.  The blues of Booker’s Guitar won’t be to every listener’s liking – this is blues music for the brain as well as the heart and soul, and if you’ll take the time to thoroughly enjoy Eric Bibb’sBooker’s Guitar, you’ll be richly rewarded.
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I must begin this review with a little blues history.  Booker (aka Bukka) White was well known for playing National steel guitars.  His name, much to his chagrin, was misspelled in 1937 by Vocalion, his second record label, and it stuck with him for the rest of his life.  The cousin of BB King (who gave BB his first guitar, a Stella) was a consummate blues man and slide guitar player.  Eric Bibb met a man named Keith while touring the UK who offered Eric a chance to play Booker’s guitar, affectionately named “Hard Rock” by Booker.  Keith and Booker became friends during the American Folk Blues Festivals that exposed the kings of the blues to Europe back in the 1960’s.  After meeting and recording Booker on cassette and exchanging countless letters, Booker sent “Hard Rock” to Keith as a gift shortly before he passed away in 1977.  Keith has protected and kept the fabled instrument, and even showed it to BB King who remembered it sitting in White’s place in Memphis many years go.  Bibb fondly remembered the experience and later wrote the song “Booker’s Guitar” with the intent to record it while playing the guitar, which he has done.  Along with the title track, Bibb has recorded 15 tracks along with a second promo CD of 3 bonus tracks (one for itunes and two as bonus downloads for CD buyers).  Set for release in late January, 2010, Telarc Records and Bibb join up for their fourth album together.

The title track is an interesting story about the guitar, Booker’s heart shaped charm that he affixed to the guitar, the old dirty brown case it lived in and the scotch taped play list on the case.  Bibb sings and plays almost reverently, with the sweet sounding notes coming off this 75+ year old guitar like it was new.  Eric is a master at solo acoustic blues and here he gives us a humble and humbling performance.  His three decades of experience melt away as he plays this song and Booker’s guitar.  I found it quite moving even though it was a studio recording.

So where does that leave us?  Well, it is the first song on the CD, so we are girded and ready for 14 more tracks delivered as Bibb only can.  He plays with a thoughtful and metered approach to his music.  Never showy, his guitar and occasion harp are given to us to listen to, mull over and accept.  His voice takes on the same timber as his guitar, restrained yet powerful, in control but with a maelstrom of power and intensity living behind it.  Whether it be slow blues, folk, a little boogie woogie, in an old spiritual style or whatever, we are listening to a man who knows his craft well.  There is no need for flashiness or bravado; his soul-filled baritone voice and impeccable guitar work speak volumes.  He picks and plunks his way through each track like the guitar master that he is, selecting each note as a shrine to the music he plays.

Singling out other particular tracks would be futile.  Each delivers to us a story that must be heard, whether he sings of water tasting like turpentine instead of cherry wine or about sitting on the porch in the shade and talking about his new rocking chair, we are listening to a man with a set of stories to tell us and we are compelled to sit and listen to each and every one of them.  Folk blues at it’s finest; Bibb and Telarc have produced another fine album here that will be listened to over and over in sublime and utter joyfulness as Eric lives his hopes and dreams out through his songs.
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The story is as legendary as Robert Johnson at the crossroads, as old as the blues itself. A traveling musician has a chance encounter in the most unlikely of places with something mystical and powerful, and everything changes. Suddenly, everything is up for grabs, and the music – already rich and historically resonant – takes a whole new direction.
So it was for itinerant troubadour Eric Bibb one night in a London hotel after a gig just a few years ago, when he was approached by a fan carrying a guitar case. Inside the case was a relic from the past that made the hair on the back of Bibb’s neck stand on end: a 1930s vintage Resophonic National steel-body guitar that had belonged to Delta blues legend Booker White. In a moment that could only be described as intoxicating, Bibb found himself holding Booker’s guitar, and catching a brief but revealing glimpse of all the stories locked within it.

Booker’s Guitar inspired a song, and the song became an entire album – one that captures the spirit of the original Delta blues of the early 20th century and reinterprets it for a new era. The title track, Bibb recorded in England using White’s guitar. The remaining tracks, although recorded in rural Ohio on Bibb’s own guitars, sprang from the same well of inspiration. “Once I had written that song, I really wanted to make a complete statement and document my connection to the Delta blues tradition,” says Bibb. “I really wanted to put myself in the position of my heroes, but in a contemporary context, and create songs that I feel could have been part of their repertoire and could have come from their own experience.”

That journey is one that crosses generations as much distances on any map. In the end, Booker’s Guitar – mystical and powerful – is the instrument that connects Eric Bibb to another era, and at the same time connects the blues of another era to the human experience of the modern day. “Writing a country blues song that draws on the traditions but is not rehashing old material from another era – writing something that’s both connected to that tradition but is contemporary as well – is hugely challenging,” says Bibb. “It’s tricky, but I was so happy that I was able to do it for a whole album, and really feel like I could stay focused on that whole sound and that whole culture. It was an achievement that I had been wanting to pull off, but hadn’t been able to do until now.”
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A masterful writer and guitarist with an excellent voice, Bibb, solo and with top-flight harmonica player Grant Dermody, doesn’t re-create deep blues and spirituals. He adds to the book. With originals that deal with classic blues subjects (Flood Water, New Home, One Soul to Save), a salute to reading (Turning Pages), a soulful love song with New Orleans inspiration (Rocking Chair) and a couple of classics (Nobody’s Fault But Mine, Wayfaring Stranger), Bibb not only does right by White, he does blues up right.
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Eric Bibb is usually acclaimed as an imaginative and talented acoustic guitarist, but as shown by Booker’s Guitar, he’s a skilled wordsmith as well. The structure, melody, and intelligent lyricism of the songs here are supported by Bibb’s warm, authoritative vocals and creative fretwork. Although inspired by pre-war Delta blues music, Bibb has brought the acoustic country-blues sound into the new century, and as such his material has all of the gravitas and punch of the old stuff, combined with the immediacy and vitality of modern music.

That said, however, the blues of Booker’s Guitar won’t be to every listener’s liking. The folkish man-and-his-acoustic-guitar approach may chafe those who like loudly-amped music, and Bibb’s vocals are, at times, somber and appropriately monochromatic in their delivery. Listen carefully, however, and you’ll feel the flames beneath the smoke, and if Bibb’s unique reading of the blues is anything, it’s not wallpaper. This is blues music for the brain as well as the heart and soul, and if you’ll take the time to thoroughly enjoy Eric Bibb’s Booker’s Guitar, you’ll be richly rewarded.
**
Bookers Guitar set for retail on January 26, 2010. The story is as legendary as Robert Johnson at the crossroads, as old as the blues itself. A traveling musician has a chance encounter in the most unlikely of places with something mystical and powerful, and everything changes.
Suddenly, everything is up for grabs, and the music already rich and historically resonant takes a whole new direction. So it was for itinerant troubadour Eric Bibb one night in a London hotel after a gig just a few years ago, when he was approached by a fan carrying a guitar case. Inside the case was a relic from the past that made the hair on the back of Bibbs neck stand on end: a 1930s vintage Resophonic National steel-body guitar that had belonged to Delta blues legend Booker White.
In a moment that could only be described as intoxicating, Bibb found himself holding Bookers guitar, and catching a brief but revealing glimpse of all the stories locked within it. The encounter inspired a song, and the song became an entire album one that captures the spirit of the original Delta blues of the early 20th century and reinterprets it for a new era.
**
01. Booker’s Guitar 2:52
02. With My Maker I Am One 3:41
03. Flood Water 4:31
04. Walkin’ Blues Again 3:17
05. Sunrise Blues 3:00
06. Wayfaring Stranger 4:40
07. Train From Aberdeen 1:33
08. New Home 3:47
09. Nobody’s Fault But Mine 2:10
10. One Soul To Save 3:00
11. Rocking Chair 3:57
12. Turning Pages 2:52
13. A Good Woman 3:14
14. Tell Riley 3:16
15. A – Z Blues 3:14
**
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Eric BIBB & Needed Time – Good Stuff 1997

Posted in BLUES, Eric BIBB on November 18, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Eric BIBB & Needed Time – Good Stuff  1997

Blues

Eric Bibb’s debut album, Good Stuff, is a clever fusion of contemporary folk and classic country-blues and classic gospel that emphasizes the guitarist’s skill at fusing genres, as well as his flair for writing solid bluesy songs. Not all of the material really catches hold, but it all shows promise, and the very best moments on the record confirm that he’s one of the more intriguing new bluesmen in the late ’90s.
By Thom Owens.
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Eric Bibb- Guitar), Banjo, Lute, Vocals, Guitar 12 String,National Steel Guitar
Janne Bohman, Derrick Walker- Harmonica
The Deacons,Paris & Andre De Lange- Background Vocals
Nick Malmestrom- Guitar
Göran Wennerbrandt- Bottleneck Guitar & Guitars
Janne Peterson- Accordion, Pupm Organ,& Piano
Christer Lyssarides- Bouzouki, Guitar, Mandolin
Hassan Bah- Congoma
Bjorn Gideonsson- Drums & Percussion
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01. Good Stuff 3´18
02. Saucer ´n` Cup 3´43
03. Shingle By Shingle 3´28
04. Don’t Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down 6´50
05. Where The Green Green Grass Grows 4´27
06. Blacksmith Island 2´16
07. New World Comin’ Through 3´23
08. Too Much Whisky 3´19
09. Nothin’ Like You Used To Do 4´30
10. All Of My Love 3´33
11. A Simple Song 3´45
12. Happy Home Recipe 2´45
13. Done Laid Around 4´58
14. Rough Waters 4´45
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