Archive for the John Lee HOOKER Category

John Lee HOOKER – That's My Story 2001 (AVI)

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER, MOVIES on December 24, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John Lee HOOKER – That’s My Story 2001 (AVI)

Blues

“The world’s greatest blues singer”? That’s arguable, but there’s no doubt that the late John Lee Hooker (1917-2001) was in a class by himself, a genuine original whose music–raw, primitively simple, scary even, powered by his deep moan of a voice–was the very embodiment of the Delta blues style. Big names like Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, and many more line up to pay tribute to the man in this absorbing 90-minute documentary; there are also plenty of interviews with family, friends, business associates, and the grizzled, laconic bluesman himself, along with some decent performance footage (as is usual in such projects, we get no complete songs). But this 2000 film’s best moments come courtesy of writer-director Joerg Bundschuh’s beautifully photographed contemporary footage, with no accompaniment except the hypnotic groove and profound soul of John Lee Hooker’s music.
By Sam Graham.
**
John Lee Hooker tells the tale himself, with help of his family, closest friends, and musical colleagues including Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, Bonnie Raitt, Robert Cray, and John Mayall. That s My Story takes audiences inside the life and times of this Blues legend. Also known as the Godfather of Blues , John Lee Hooker s music is played in this film, showing rare and captivating live performance footage, archive recordings from the very beginning of his career to video clips from the peak of his success, including the Grammy Award-winning duet with Bonnie Raitt I’m In The Mood.
**
If u keep holding your tears,while you watching this movie,means;you ain´t got no fuckin clue what “Blues” means.
themonk.
**
01. Introduction [4:24]
02. Doc Hook & Archie Lee [5:30]
03. The Empire [6:52]
04. Roots [7:31]
05. Road to Memphis [6:59]
06. Ladies Man [7:27]
07. Discovered [8:20]
08. Exploited [9:41]
09. The Source [10:52]
10. Nobody Knows [10:05]
11. Jammin’ With the Boys [8:07]
12. End Credits [2:08]
**
Continue reading

Santana & John Lee HOOKER – Feb 25th, 1989

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER, Santana on December 19, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Santana & John Lee HOOKER – Feb 25th, 1989
Bay Area Music Awards Feb 25th, 1989
San Francisco Civic Auditoium
California,USA
Bootleg.

Blues

01. Intro 2:08
02. John Lee Hooker Accepts Lifetime Achievement Award 1:59
John Lee Hooker and the Coast to Coast Blues Band with Carlos Santana
03. The Healer 5:46
04. Boom Boom 4:44
05. Your Love is Allright 9:51
Carlos Santana with The Caribbean Allstars
06. Carlos Intro 0:43
07. Soweto (Africa Libre) 7:16
08. Growing Up,Cloud Nine 10:23
Allstar Jam featuring John Fogerty,Sammy Hagar and Carlos Santana
09. On Stage Banter 3:02
10. Sweet Home Chicago 4;42
11. Midnight Hour 4:40
**

Continue reading

John Lee HOOKER – Jack O'Diamonds,1949 Recordings 2004

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER on December 19, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John Lee HOOKER – Jack O’Diamonds,1949 Recordings 2004

Blues

Lost for more than 50 years, these sessions–engineered by cartoonist and blues fan Gene Deitch at his home in Detroit– feature a young Hooker performing solo on acoustic guitar. The clarity and intimacy of the recording is astounding. While the bluesman’s sound got leaner and meaner over the years, there is an intensity here that dazzles, all the more so for the minimalist setting. In addition, Hooker’s repertoire at the time included spirituals and songs he learned growing up, many that he never recorded again. JACK O’ DIAMONDS, then, amounts to a very unique document from this blues legend.

Navigating John Lee Hooker’s mammoth, multi-label discography can be a formidable task, one made no less daunting by a slew of compilations and reissues of early material. Given the superior quality of these performances, however, with their dark, spare atmosphere driven by Hooker’s hypnotic, primitive riffs and soulful, understated singing, JACK O’ DIAMONDS: 1949 RECORDINGS is a buried treasure.
**
Early recordings of Hook from a private party in 1949. Vocal stylings are still nascent, not as confident or wild as he’d get, but the guitar is in place, as the liners rightly point out. All enjoyable stuff for fans, not strictly for musicologists either, though killer standout tracks are in short supply.
**
This is 1949. Johhnie Lee is young. It is the moment just before big initial hits “Boogie Chillen” and “Boom Boom Boom” hit the market.

We’re not in a recording studio. We’re in the living room of a Detroit blues lover who had him over for dinner and a party. Instead of the repertoire record sellers demand so they could claim each tune for their thieving selves, we have Hooker, free, requested not to play that music. He’s playing in the African American tradition not competing for bucks with other R & B stars.

Instead, Hooker sings hymns, folk songs, blues that radiated out from recording of the great 1920s bluesmasters like Leroy Carr to become effectively traditional, tunes Hooker brought up to Detroit from Clarksdale, Mississippi. This recording shows us that while the greed and stereotyping of the record industry restricted Black guitarists like Hooker to blues, Hooker at least retained a very good selection of traditional dance tunes, hymns,and other African American folk songs.

I love “How Long Blues” and “In the Evening when the Sun Go Down.” If you don’t know Robert Johnson’s “Love in Vain,” is simply a remake of Leroy Carr’s “In the Evening,” you will know that after they hear Hooker’s powerful rendition on this CD. There is more pain and more poetry in Hooker’s “Catfish Blues,” than in the sexier version Muddy Waters put out about the same time. Johnnie Lee isn’t singing about hunger for sex, but hunger for love, deep heart hunger that he will sing about for the rest of his life.

Hooker’s rhythmic power rocks the Hymn “Ezekiel Saw the Wheel.” “Jack of Diamonds” is smack dabb in the middle between banjo songs and blues. He does “Rabitt on the Log” an African American version of a song made famous as “feast here to night by the Monroe Brothers.” The Blackness of these tunes is manifest in these versions. You see the sistas and brothers back in the juke joint or in a house dance really moving to Hooker’s voice and guitar, maybe with a fiddle, a mandolin or eeven a banjo beside him to these tunes. Even Big Monroe sounds tame Johnnie Lee whose bunny seems to ache with love hunger.

I was touched by “I Wonder,” a Pop/RB tune out at the time of this recording. Hooker barely knows the words and stumbles a few times. Yet, it is an early example of the subtlety, poetry and pure heart and feeling that Hooker often reaches when he is singing non blues pop or jazz songs. He doesn’t need the perfect words to express himself. He treats them like a blues, where every singer is expected to change the words, even the melody at times to create create a their very ownmeaning, that song becoming absolutely their song at that moment, not just repeating someone else’s tune.

Hooker will do this later on standards like “I cover the Waterfront,” “Sentimenta1 Journey,” and even on “I left my Heart in San Fransisco” which Hooker will refashion into the “‘Frisco Blues.”

Here, he is singing this in someone’s living room, and you are touched. Rather than the primitive that Hooker is often viewed as, he was a distinctive and creative artist with a sensitive gift for feeling, nuance, and meaning, a creative force armed with a unique combination of the traditional African American music feel, educated in the deep Mississippi Blues, but ready with the modern technology of the electric guitar and boogie rhythm to take this out to touch the entire world.

The remastered sound here is first rate thanks to the fact that the person who recorded it had a state of the art professional tape recorder in his home, and that this CD is being reissued as part of the Hooker estate’s effort to bring out Hooker’s music in quality editions.

Hookers singing is more personal, more vibrant, and even a bit shy here compared to his other recordings. The guitar playing is apparently acoustic, but it is very rhythmic, very sharp, very much Hooker with the tunes perhaps a bit faster than normal.

If you love Hooker, you must have this album. If you are interested in the places where the Blues and traditional southern African American music meet, you must have this album.
If you want Johnnie Lee to come into your home to sing and play while you share good wine and better food, you must buy this CD!
By  Tony Thomas.
**
As I, Gene Deitch, am the man that recorded John Lee Hooker at my Detroit home in 1949 – the very tapes that over 50 years later have been issued on the Eagle Records CD, entitled “Jack O’Diamonds: 1949 Recordings,” I am extremely gratified by the warm and loving reviews appearing here. Thank you.
By Gene Deitch.
**
01.Guitar Blues Instrumental 3:20
02.Two White Horses 3:21
03.Trouble In Mind 3:57
04.Catfish Blues 2:51
05.John Henry 3:08
06.How Long Blues 3:31
07.Ezeskiel Saw The Wheel 2:57
08.Jack O’ Diamonds 2:47
09.Water Boy 3:54
10.Six Little Puppies And Twelve Shaggy Dogs 4:20
11.In The Evening When The Sun Goes Down 4:38
12.Old Blind Barnabes 2:28
13.Moses Smote The Water 1:56
14.Spoken Interlude 0:33
15.Rabbit On The Log 4:02
16.Come And See About Me 2:14
17.33 Blues 2:04
18.She’s Real Gone 2:13
19.I Wonder 2:45
20.Untitled Slow Blues 3:01
**

Continue reading

Van MORRISON & John Lee HOOKER – Together 2007

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER, Van MORRISON on December 18, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Van MORRISON & John Lee HOOKER – Together 2007

Blues

Blues dean John Lee Hooker and Belfast cowboy Van Morrison, together again. For many listeners, it doesn’t get much better than this. The two have collaborated on piecemeal projects for the last 25 years but unite definitively on Hooker’s new album, “Don’t Look Back.” It’s produced by Morrison, who also sings on four tracks and seems to be living a disciple’s dream. “A lot of people can’t work with Van, but him and me team up well,” Hooker said last week. “We got a lot of love and respect for each other.

“We’re good buddies. He calls me all the time to see how I’m doing. I say, `I’m an old man, but I’m still hanging in there, Van.’ ”
**
01. I Cover The Waterfront
02. Serves Me Right To Suffer
03. Ball & Chain
04. Don’t Look Back
05. Never Get Out Of This
06. Travelin’ Blues
07. The Healing Game
08. Wasted Years
09. Rainy Day
10. Gloria
**
NoPassword
*
DLink RS
DLink MU
*
Please Donate

John Lee HOOKER – Bedroom Boogie 1976

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER on December 14, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John Lee HOOKER – Bedroom Boogie 1976
Wise Fools Pub, Chicago, IL, USA / November 9, 1976 / Broadcast Date unknown
Radio broadcast on WXRT
Recorded by Ken Rasek for WXRT at Wise Fools Pub November 9, 1976.

Blues

01. Boom Boom 4:18
02. Serves Me Right To Suffer 4:19
03. You Know It Ain’t Right 4:07
04. Hobo Blues 4:20
05. One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer 4:10
06. Whiskey And Women 5:40
07. Crawlin’ King Snake 4:12
08. Boogie Chillen 9:03
09. You Know I Love You 5:41
10. Maudie 4:10
11. Crazy ’bout You Baby 4:43
Bonus:
Bonus Track 12: Jul 15, 1983, Montreux Jazz Festival, Montreux, Switzerland
Bonus Tracks 13 – 14: 1962, Basel, Switzerland, Swiss Radio Broadcast
12 – Boogie Chillen 15:32
13 – I Need Some Money 3:08
14 – Bundle Up And Go 2:13
**

Continue reading

John Lee HOOKER – Live in Montreal 1980 (AVI)

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER, MOVIES on December 4, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John Lee HOOKER – Live in Montreal 1980 (AVI)

Blues

This 1980 concert film captures blues legend John Lee Hooker performing at the Montreal Jazz Festival. The man performs close to a dozen songs including “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer,” “Boom Boom,” “I’m in the Mood,” and “Chicken and Gravy.” The DVD release of the film includes additional footage of the guitarist.
By Perry Seibert, All Movie Guide.
**
Legendary blues musician John Lee Hooker wailed with a voice that was full of rugged experience, buried pain, and weathered wisdom. His songs and persona influenced some of the most famous rock musicians of all time, with the Rolling Stones citing him as an inspiration. ON LIVE IN MONTREAL, Hooker performs some of his most emotional songs, including “It Serves Me Right to Suffer” and “Look at What You Did to My Life.”

The world’s greatest blues singer, John Lee Hooker reached legendary status with his deep, weathered voice and distinctive chugging rhythms. His influence spread to an entire generation of blues-tinged rockers, including The Rolling Stones and The Doors. Hooker’s music is a lesson in deep blues, and here he revisits some of his most familiar material, including “Boom Boom” and his biggest hit, “I’m in the Mood.” Filled with frisky, guitar-driven boogies and heartsick ballads, this is the blues at its very best! Songs: It Serves Me Right to Suffer, One Bourbon One Scotch One Beer, I’ll Never Get Out of These Blues Alive, Roll Me Like You Roll a Wagon Wheel, Boom Boom, I’m in the Mood, Look at What You Did to My Life, Chicken and Gravy, We’re Gonna Do the Shout.
**
The world’s greatest blues singer, John Lee Hooker reached legendary status with his deep, weathered voice and distinctive chugging rhythms. His influence spread to an entire generation of blues-tinged rockers, including The Rolling Stones …    Full Descriptionand The Doors. Hooker’s music is a lesson in deep blues, and here he revisits some of his most familiar material, including “Boom Boom” and his biggest hit, “I’m in the Mood.” Filled with frisky, guitar-driven boogies and heartsick ballads, this is the blues at its very best! Songs: It Serves Me Right to Suffer, One Bourbon One Scotch One Beer, I’ll Never Get Out of These Blues Alive, and more!
Legendary blues musician John Lee Hooker wailed with a voice that was full of rugged experience, buried pain, and weathered wisdom. His songs and persona influenced some of the most famous rock musicians of all time, with the Rolling Stones citing him as an inspiration. ON LIVE IN MONTREAL, Hooker performs some of his most emotional songs, including “It Serves Me Right to Suffer” and “Look at What You Did to My Life.”
**
John Lee Hooker- Vocal/Guitar
Gary Alongi- Guitar
Gary Hoff- Drums
Steve Gomes- Bass
**
01.Opening
02.Instrumental 1
03.Instrumental 2
04.It Serves Me Right to Suffer
05.One Bourbon,One Scotch,One Beer
06.I`ll Never Get Out of These Blues Alive
07.Roll Me Like You a Wagon Wheel
08.Boom Boom
09.I`m in the Mood
10.Look at What You Did to My Life
11.Chicken & Gravy
12.We`re Gonna Do the Shout
13.End Credits
**

Continue reading

John Lee HOOKER – Face To Face 2003

Posted in BLUES, John Lee HOOKER on November 20, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John Lee HOOKER – Face To Face 2003

Blues

This is a mixed bag of styles, but all of it is good. Every song is great on it’s own terms. For those that like the “Vee-Jay” sound there are re-worked versions of “Dimples”, “Mad Man Blues”, “Wednesday Evening Blues” and “Boogie Chillen”. I especially like “Wednesday Evening Blues” – if one did not know any better you would swear this one was recorded in the 50’s! Most of the rest of the album has John Lee doing some very funky stuff with real soul – “Funky Mabel” is great! And yes, there are also one or two somewhat sugar-coated songs that initially seem out of character for John Lee, yet he still pulls them off with style. However, overall this is a very solid Hooker CD and one I have been returning to more often than I expected. I like this album MUCH better than “The Healer” album which is just too much guest star and not enough John Lee. “Face to Face vol. 1” is John Lee Hooker through and through from beginning to end; the guest stars are hardly ever noticed. You really should sample this CD, it is far better than you might think.
**
Final Recordings, Vol. 1: Face to Face combines previously released material from John Lee Hooker with unfinished tracks he was working on before he died. Compiled by the estate of Hooker, with his daughter Zakiya at the helm, the unreleased material leans heavily toward soul-blues united with Hooker’s patented electric Delta boogie. “Loving People,” “Funky Mabel,” “Six Page Letter” (a ballad with synth strings), and “Rock These Blues Away” are highlights. Zakiya Hooker takes the spotlight on “Mean Mean World,” singing lead alongside her father, and the acoustic “Wednesday Evening Blues” features George Thorogood on guitar. Hooker staples “Dimples,” “It Serves Me Right to Suffer,” “Mad Man Blues,” and “Boogie Chillen” also make their perennial appearances. While there are no real surprises here, Face to Face still sounds great and is recommended alongside John Lee’s last official releases, Chill Out and Don’t Look Back, both on Pointblank.
By Al Campbell. AMG.
**
Mr. Hooker certainly isn’t the only artist to release “new” music after his death. But his new CD sure-enough is better than almost anyone else who has. Rather than a plodding, macabre effort to cash in one more time (you know the ones I’m talking about), this CD is as vibrant as, well, life!
Following Mr. Hooker’s recent success formula once again, a stellar cast contributes. And oh, mama, what a lineup: Van Morrison, Elvin Bishop, Jack Cassidy, Johnny Winter, Warren Hayes, Dickie Betts and George Thoroughgood. With these backing musicians, even I could sound passable. But behind Mr. Lucky you can imagine the great results. Serious performers only, if you please.
My personal favorite track is “Dimples” featuring a duet with Van The Man and Elvin Bishop on second lead guitar. But that choice might just change on repeated listens. There ain’t a dog amongst the 15 tunes here, and how often can you say that about a CD anymore, even on so-called “Greatest Hits” packages?
By  D. Sean Brickell.
**
In June 2001, at the time of his death at the ripe old age of 83, John Lee Hooker had been recording material for a new album. Much like his 1989 comeback outing The Healer — as well as everything he released in the intervening years — the collection, which appropriately is titled Face to Face, was designed to pair Hooker with a plethora of special guests. Still, it was far from complete, and after his passing it took over two years to put the finishing touches upon the project.
It’s certainly true that most posthumously completed albums of this sort wind up sounding forced, and the collaborations frequently feel disconnected and out of place. In other words, there are plenty of places where Face to Face seriously could have gone astray, but credit must be given to his daughter Zakiya Hooker and producer Ollan Christopher Bell, who took painstaking efforts to keep the late bluesman’s voice and vision intact, turning the song cycle into what undoubtedly is the must- have blues album of the year.
In fact, Face to Face actually works better than any of Hooker’s recent celebrity-studded outings. Though the all-star cast of Jack Casady, Johnnie Johnson, George Thorogood, Tony Saunders, Warren Haynes, Dickey Betts, Elvin Bishop, Johnny Winter, and Van Morrison combines its efforts to flavor Hooker’s songs, its collective contributions are wholly unobtrusive. It could be anyone adding the exquisite guitar, bass, and keyboard accompaniments to the album’s 15 tracks; that they happen to be such well-known performers merely makes the album marketable on a broader scale. Rather than undermine the proceedings, the guests largely lurk in the shadows, and as a result, the arrangements perfectly reflect the spirit of Hooker’s decades-long career, allowing the focus to remain exactly where it should — on one of the biggest influences in blues and rock history.
Ever since he made a name for himself in Detroit in the 1940s by redefining the blues, Hooker’s droning, single-chord vamps have never sounded anywhere near as drab as one might expect. Instead, they are extraordinarily versatile and sit quite comfortably in whatever context they happen to be placed. Whether performed solo or surrounded by a full band, whether relayed with a driving rock beat or as a funereal back porch moan, what consistently brings his songs to life is his passionately compelling delivery. Quite frankly, no one sings the blues like John Lee Hooker, and his unique, soul-stirring expressions burn brighter than ever on Face to Face as he revisits some old chestnuts and crafts a few new ones. Though each song explores the blues from a variety of vastly different perspectives, all are held together by his singularly signature style as well as his peerlessly emotive and captivating growl. Through his gruff vocals, he manages to convey the naked emotion of a man rubbed raw by the dark roads of life, but he also fills them with the rough ’n‘ tough bravado that is a necessity for surviving the desolate byways of the Deep South where he grew up. Whether succumbing to the groove of Funky Mabel, wallowing in the self-pity of It Serves Me Right to Suffer, getting positively soulful on Loving People, or lamenting love on Six Page Letter, John Lee Hooker proves time and again why he was one-of-a-kind. Indeed, it would be a simple matter to dismiss Face to Face as yet another effort that surrounds a legend with an array of special guests, or worse, one that tries to capitalize upon his death. However, it’s neither of those things. It’s simply an awe- inspiring final bow that finds Hooker gracefully joining that great gig in the sky and loving every minute of it.
**
John Lee Hooker- (Vocals, Guitar);
Van Morrison, Zakiya Hooker- (Vocals);
Ron Thompson- (Guitar, Organ);
Dickey Betts, Elvin Bishop, Robert “Red Top” Young, Anthony Cook, George Thorogood, Billy Friday Johnson- (Guitar);
Johnny Winter, Warren Haynes- (Slide Guitar);
Dean McKinney Moore- (Sax);
Dan Zemelman- (Piano);
Jim Pugh, Tony Saunders- (Organ);
Joe Thomas , Ruth Davies- (Upright Bass);
Kevin Williams , Marlon Green, Kevin Hayes , Scott Mathews, Bowen Brown- (Drums);
Terrance Kelly, Tina Bryant, Gary Benson- (Background Vocals).
**
01. Big Road  5:25
Bass – Jack Casady
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Robert Young , Roy Rogers , Warren Haynes
Written-By – John Lee Hooker , Tommy Johnson

02. Dimples  4:44
Bass – Ruth Davies
Drums – Kevin Hayes
Guitar – Elvin Bishop
Organ – Jim Pugh
Vocals – Van Morrison
Written-By – James Bracken , John Lee Hooker

03. Loving People  5:14
Backing Vocals – Gail Benson , Terrance Kelly , Tina Bryant
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Anthony Cook , Billy Johnson , Robert Young
Piano – Dan Zemelman
Written-By – John Lee Hooker , Ollan Christopher Bell , Zakiya Hooker

04. Face To Face  5:19
Bass – Jack Casady
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Johnny Winter
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

05. Funky Mabel  3:53
Bass – Tony Saunders
Drums – Bowen Brown
Guitar – Ron Thompson
Organ – Ron Thompson , Tony Saunders
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

06. It Serves Me Right To Suffer  5:48
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Kevin Hayes
Guitar – Dickey Betts , Robert Young
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

07. Up And Down  4:46
Bass – Steve Ehrmann
Drums – Scott Mathews
Guitar – Warren Haynes
Piano – Johnny Johnson
Written-By – John Lee Hooker , Lynn Pini

08. Mad Man Blues  3:06
Guitar – George Thorogood , Roy Rogers
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

09. Six Page Letter  5:30
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Billy Johnson
Piano – Dan Zemelman
Saxophone – Dean Moore
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

10. Stop Jivin’ Me  3:24
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Billy Johnson , George Thorogood
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

11. Mean Mean World  6:12
Bass – Ollan Christopher Bell
Drums – Kevin Williams
Guitar – Anthony Cook , Billy Johnson
Synthesizer – Anthony Cook
Vocals – Zakiya Hooker
Written-By – John Lee Hooker , Ollan Christopher Bell , Zakiya Hooker

12. Turn Over A New Leaf  5:10
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Anthony Cook
Written-By – Bernard Besman , John Lee Hooker

13. Wednesday Evening Blues  4:16
Guitar – George Thorogood
Written-By – John Lee Hooker

14. Boogie Chillen’  2:44
Guitar – George Thorogood
Written-By – Bernard Besman , John Lee Hooker

15. Rock These Blues Away  3:50
Bass – Joe Thomas
Drums – Marlon Green
Guitar – Anthony Cook , Billy Johnson , Robert Young
Vocals – Zakiya Hooker
Written-By – John Lee Hooker , Ollan Christopher Bell , Zakiya Hooker
**

Continue reading