Archive for the Nat ADDERLEY Category

Nat ADDERLEY – Work Song 1960

Posted in JAZZ, Nat ADDERLEY on December 10, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Nat ADDERLEY – Work Song 1960
OJCCD 363-2
1989 Issue.

Jazz

This album brings back a near-classic by cornetist Nat Adderley. Utilizing a cornet-cello-guitar front line (with Sam Jones and Wes Montgomery) along with a top-notch rhythm section (pianist Bobby Timmons, Percy Heath, or Keter Betts on bass and drummer Louis Hayes), Adderley performs a fine early version of his greatest hit (“Work Song”) and helps introduce Cannonball Adderley’s “Sack O’ Woe.” Four songs use a smaller group with Timmons absent on “My Heart Stood Still” (which finds Keter Betts on cello and Jones on bass), “Mean to Me” featuring Nat backed by Montgomery, Betts, and Hayes, and two ballads (“I’ve Got a Crush on You” and “Violets for Your Furs”) interpreted by the Adderley-Montgomery-Jones trio. No matter the setting, Nat Adderley is heard throughout in peak form, playing quite lyrically. Highly recommended. By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
Nat Adderley- (Cornet);
Keter Betts- (Cello);
Percy Heath- (Bass);
Wes Montgomery- (Guitar);
Sam Jones- (Cello);
Bobby Timmons- (Piano);
Louis Hayes- (Drums).
**
01. Work Song  4:12
02. Pretty Memory  3:50
03. I’ve Got a Crush on You  2:53
04. Mean to Me  4:59
05. Fallout  4:51
06. Sack o’ Woe  4:24
07. My Heart Stood Still  6:24
08. Violets for Your Furs  3:47
09. Scrambled Eggs  3:20
**

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Nat ADDERLEY – Autobiography 1965

Posted in JAZZ, Nat ADDERLEY on December 6, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Nat ADDERLEY – Autobiography 1965
SD 1439

Jazz

Cornetist Nat Adderley’s first album as a leader after the collapse of Riverside found him switching to Atlantic and performing eight of his most rewarding compositions. With several brass players, Seldon Powell on tenor and flute, pianist Joe Zawinul (who provided the arrangements), bassist Sam Jones, Grady Tate or Bruno Carr on drums and guest spots by Victor Pantoja and Willie Bobo on Latin percussion, Nat performs such numbers as his greatest hit “Work Song,” “Sermonette,” “The Old Country,” “Little Boy With The Sad Eyes” and “Jive Samba.” It is a pity that the music on this valuable Lp has yet to be reissued on CD.
By Scott Yanow. All Music Guide.
**
Congas- Victor Pantoja (tracks: A4,B1,B4)
Cornet- Nat Adderley
Double Bass- Sam Jones
Drums- Bruno Carr (tracks: A2,A4,B1,B2,B4) , Grady Tate (tracks: A1,A3,B3)
Percussion- Willie Bobo (tracks: A4,B1,B4)
Piano- Joe Zawinul
Saxophone [Tenor], Flute- Seldon Powell
Trombone- Tony Studd (tracks: A2,B2)
Trombone [Bass]- Benny Powell (tracks: A1,A3,B3)
Trumpet- Ernie Royal
Tuba- Don Butterfield (tracks: A1,A2,A3,B2,B3)
**
A1. Sermonette 5:55
A2. Work Song 3:55
A3. The Old Country 4:25
A4. Junkanoo 3:03
B1. Stony Island 3:29
B2. Little Boy With The Sad Eyes 6:03
B3. Never Say Yes 4:25
B4. Jive Samba 5:20
**

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Nat ADDERLEY Quintet – Good Company 1994

Posted in JAZZ, Nat ADDERLEY on November 18, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Nat ADDERLEY Quintet – Good Company  1994

Jazz

Considering how late this was recorded in Nat Adderley’s career, the cornetist sounds in surprisingly fine form throughout the sessions. There are individual features for altoist Antonio Hart (who ranges from Tranish on “Rwanda” to playing in a more Cannonball Adderley-oriented style on the older tunes) and the McCoy Tyner-inspired pianist Rob Bargad, so Adderley (who is showcased on “You Don’t Know What Love Is”) has opportunities to rest his chops. Among the other highlights are “Sermonette,” “My Romance,” and “Unit Seven.”
Scott Yanow, All Music Guide
**
Nat Adderley- (Trumpet)
Antonio Hart- (Alto Sax)
Rob Bargad- (Piano)
Walter Booker- (Bass)
Jimmy Cobb- (Drums)
**
01. Rwanda (Adderley, Nat) 10:24
02. Sermonette (Adderley, Cannonball/Hendricks, Jon) 5:13
03. Cocovado (Jobim, Antonio Carlos) 7:16
04. Rob’s New Tune (Bargad, Rob) 8:12
05. My Romance (Rodgers, Richard/Hart, Lorenz) 5:30
06. Unit Seven (Jones, Sam) 6:18
07. You Don’t Know What Love Is (DePaul, Gene/Raye, Don) 6:52
08. War Zone (Bargad, Rob) 5:47
**

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Nat ADDERLEY – Talkin' About You 1990

Posted in JAZZ, Nat ADDERLEY on November 17, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Nat ADDERLEY – Talkin’ About You 1990

Jazz

Seems like coronetist Nat Adderley (b. 1931) has been around forever. But no one really started listening to him in his own right him until the unfortunate early death of his older brother in 1975. It’s a true shame. Because there is ample evidence of this guy’s gifts on many Cannonball records (1959-1975) and, surprisingly, nearly three dozen recordings of his own. Talkin’ About You, its title a dedication to Cannonball, is a typically strong set recorded in 1990 and first released on Orrin Keepnews’s Landmark label. No surprises occur, but it’s one solid set that benefits from Nat’s sterling work on coronet and highlights alto player Vincent Herring’s frighteningly cloned Cannonball sound. Herring is a great player in his own right. But it’s scary to hear how well he has mastered his idol’s sound; right down to intonation, punctuation, ideas and execution. Former Cannonball associates and hard-bop veterans – bassist Walter Booker and drummer Jimmy Cobb – are another benefit to this set’s success. Highlights include the soul-jazz of Nat’s “Talkin’ About You, Cannon,” the swinging bop of his “Plum Street,” the Cannonball soul of pianist Rob Bargad’s “Mo’s Theme,” the blues of Victor Feldman’s “Azule Serape” and Jimmy Heath’s “Big ‘P’” (the last two are notably resurrected from the Adderley’s 1960 Riverside LP, Live At The Lighthouse). The standards, while professional and well-intended, don’t add much, but are few in number. One can only hope the availability of Talkin’ About Youwill encourage listeners to think twice about Nat Adderley’s talents. He’s left his own legacy and this set sums it up rather nicely.
By Doug Payne.
**
I really miss Cannonball. This CD blows away some of my blues, because some of these tunes are very close to the power of the Nat-Cannonball music of the early sixties. Especially the Cleanhead Vinson number, “Arriving Soon”, which was on Cannonball-Cleanhead record. Herring, the sax player, does a great job at re-interpreting this, at times it sounds like Cannonball had returned to update his original (or was it Vinson?) thoughts. This CD is worth buying because the good numbers are great, and the more medium tunes are still pleasant, with well thought out solos.
I agree with the above review, also, with an exception concerning Zawinul: he didn’t get lost in fusion, he continued writing innovative music for many years, but his well of ideas simply dried up as he got older (in the 1980’s) as is the case with most musicians.
By James S. Yeoman.
**
Although an incisive soloist and a fine bandleader, cornetist Nat Adderley is probably best known first as his brother Cannonball’s sidekick and as the man who has maintained the great alto saxophonist’s legacy. That’s especially true of this 1990 session, reissued by 32 Records. The title track is a dedication to Cannon; its producer, Orrin Keepnews, frequently worked the board with both Adderleys in the late ’50s; two of the sidemen, drummer Jimmy Cobb and bassist Walter Booker played extensively with the Adderleys while another, alto saxophonist Vincent Herring, is a Cannon protege. Although the stage is set for ghosts, the music is full tilt hard bop with glorious solos by each of the aforementioned plus pianist Rob Bargad, whose work on Victor Feldman’s “Azule Serape” is a highlight. Since this is a CD being reissued on CD there are no alternate takes or new material, but these eight tracks (and no “Work Song,” “Country Preacher,” or anything that obvious) stand just fine on their own merits; only seven years after its original release, it’s due another hearing.
Martin Johnson.
**
This 1990 session found Nat Adderley looking backwards, entering a New York studio with a quintet of the same proportions as Cannonball Adderley’s famous groups, some alumni in the rhythm section (Walter Booker on bass, Jimmy Cobb on drums), and straight-and-narrow hard bop on the menu. But Nat is not the crisp, confident cornetist of old; he sounds a bit lost on muted horn in an extended stretch of “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” and sputters on some other tracks, occasionally mustering enough of his optimistic, upward-looking phrasing to give his work a signature. Altoist Vincent Herring has a more forceful presence on the front line, his raw, hard tone and rhythmic sense not resembling Cannonball’s in the least, while Rob Bargad offers competent mainstream piano. As a composer, Adderley chips in two worthy pieces; “Talkin’ About You, Cannon” is a leisurely gospel-soul-jazz drenched thing, and “Plum Street” is an energetic bopper. The veterans in the rhythm section are just fine — no frills, nothing fancy, qualities that defined Nat’s music at the time.
By Richard S. Ginell, All Music Guide.
**
Nat Adderley- Cornet
Rob Bargad- Piano
Vincent Herring- Alto Sax
Walter Booker- Bass
Jimmy Cobb- Drums
**
01. Talkin’ About You, Cannon 8:52
02. I Can’t Give You Anything But Love 7:03
03. Arriving Soon 7:19
04. Plum Street 5:55
05. Azule Serape 9:21
06. Ill Wind 5:42
07. Mo’s Theme 5:42
08. Big “P” 7:22
**

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Julian "Cannonball" ADDERLEY – With Nat Adderley, Hank Jones, Paul Chambers, Kenny Clarke 1955

Posted in Hank JONES, JAZZ, Julian "Cannonball" ADDERLEY, Kenny CLARKE, Nat ADDERLEY, Paul CHAMBERS on November 16, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Julian “Cannonball” ADDERLEY – With Nat Adderley, Hank Jones, Paul Chambers, Kenny Clarke  1955
1994 Issue. Jazz Heritage 513691F

Jazz

This set has altoist Cannonball Adderley’s first recordings as a leader, following by 16 days his memorable appearance on a session headed by drummer Kenny Clarke. Already at this early stage, Adderley was a powerful player with a soulful sound that was almost distinctive. His exuberant style is heard on five selections (highlighted by “Spontaneous Combustion” and “A Little Taste”) in a quintet with his brother Nat on cornet, pianist Hank Jones, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Kenny Clarke. A very impressive beginning to a memorable career. [Originally released in 1955, Presenting Cannonball was re-released on CD in 2005.
By Stephen Reddy.
**
I am writing this in the hope that when you do pick up this album in your favorite record store, that you will take the opportunity to listen to a bit of it. Just a couple of choruses by “CANNON BALL” will be enough to assure you of his stature as a Jazzman. This is not necessarily an introduction to “CANNON BALL” as he was introduced on records via a previous album called “BOHEMIA AFTER DARK,” SAVOY MG-12017, which was just released a week before this. If you’ve already heard that album, you are sure to pick up this one also as here “CANNON BALL” is given quite a bit more time to express himself as this album features less horns, two, as against four in the “BOHEMIA AFTER DARK” Album. What I’m trying to say is that this is “CANNONBALL’s” date and, as a leader, he blows more solos than do his very capable assistants. His brother, Nat, is blowing Cornet, yeah, I said Cornet. It sounds like Trumpet, but I guess there is a slight difference to a guy that blows Cornet. I don’t think I would guess which was the Trumpet or Cornet if I were given a blindfold test. Could you?
Nat tells me he gets more facility on Cornet that’s why he made the change from Trumpet. Beside blowing some of the most exciting Jazz today, Nat collaborated with Julian on “SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION” and “STILL TALKIN’ TO YA.” “A LITTLE TASTE” and “CARIBBEAN CUTIE” are by Julian
Paul Chambers is the Bassist on these sides and he’s a joy to hear. This is a Detroit youngster who will go a long way in our Jazz field (at this writing he was 20 years old). He blows just as well whether he’s pickin’ or bowing and his ideas are wonderful. He certainly is an asset to this group.
What can I say about Hank Jones and Kenny Clarke? I’m sure that by now you all know of their talents and to compliment them again would only be repetitious. For those of you that haven’t yet realized their talents, I can only suggest that you listen. We, at Savoy, are proud that we are able to present another fine Jazz recording to you, the Jazz Enthusiast, and we sincerely hope that this will give you many, many hours of listening pleasure. ”
By Ozzie Cadena.
**
JULIAN “Cannonball” Adderley- Alto
Hank Jones- Piano
Nat Adderley -Cornet
Paul Chambers- Bass
Kenny Clarke Drums
**
01. Spontaneous Combustion   10:06
02. Still Talkin’ to Ya   8:58
03. A Little Taste   5:06
04. Caribbean Cutie   7:06
05. Flamingo   7:06
**

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