Archive for the Sonny ROLLINS Category

Sonny ROLLINS Quintet – Live in Milan '82

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on December 26, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS Quintet – Live in Milan ’82
Recorded Live at Teatro Ciak, Milan, Italy
Bootleg
Thx To *riccardo* 🙂

Jazz

Sonny Rollins-Tenor Sax
Yoshiaki Masuo, Bobby Broom- Guitars
Lincoln Goines- Electric Bass
Tommy Campbell- Drums

01. Best Wishes (26:42)
02. Coconut Bread (10:22)
03. Unknown (09:23)
04. Unknown (29:06)
05. Global Warming (09:11)
06. Don’t Stop The Carnival (14:09)
07. McGhee (17:35)
08. Unknown (03:39)
09. Unknown (09:49)
**
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Sonny ROLLINS – Horn Culture 1973

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on December 19, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS – Horn Culture 1973
M-9051

Jazz

This decent effort from Sonny Rollins finds the classic tenor saxophonist at his best on “Good Morning Heartache” and “God Bless the Child” although some of his own originals seem a touch lightweight. His backup band (which includes keyboardist Walter Davis, Jr., and guitarist Masuo) is supportive but somewhat anonymous. Nothing too essential occurs but the music is generally enjoyable.
By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
Horn Culture was the first time the listening public was introduced to Mtume’s absolutely mind blowing tune Sais. Though Mtume was the author of this tune, it was not released by him until his Rebirth Cycle album was released in 1977. This tune was also covered by Lonnie Liston Smith & the Cosmic Echoes, alternatively titled Sais (Egypt), on his 1974 release Cosmic Funk. Sonny Rollins version of this tune is one hell of a hypnotic snaking affair with the most delicate piano slowly driving the whole thing. Sonny Rollins kind of takes a bit of a back seat on this one and allows the rhythm section to carry, and lead, the whole thing. You’ve still got incredible sax work; almost a bit Pharoah Sanders screech in places, but it never over powers the solid rhythm of the tune. Of the three versions of Sais this is probably my least favorite, not that it’s not amazing, it’s just that Mtume’s monster spaced-out psychedelic 20 plus minute epic never fails to completely take over my life every time I play it. This version is more minimalist like Lonnie Liston Smith’s version, but it’s unfair to compare really as they are all so different in styles. As for the rest of the album, well it’s basically very good straight ahead jazz. The thing that gets me about this album is David Lee’s drums, even in the mellower grooves the kit is really explored and never just played. I don’t know too much about Sonny Rollins, so I can’t rate this album in comparison, but I basically just got this album for the version of Sais and ended up being very pleased with the whole thing.
**
Sonny Rollin- (Soprano & Tenor Saxophones);
Walter Davis, Jr- (Piano, Electric Piano);
Mtum- (Piano, Percussion);
Maso- (Guitar);
Bob Cransha- (Bass);
David Le- (Drums).
**
“Through overdubbing, Rollins is heard on more than one saxophone on some selections.”
Recorded at C I Recording, New York City; April, June and July, 1973.
Additional recording at Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, Cal.; June, 1973
Remixed at C I Recording.
A1, A3, B2: Sonrol-BMI
A2: Mtume Music-BMI
B1: E. B. Marks-BMI
B3: Northern-ASCAP
**
A1. Pictures In Reflection Of A Golden Horn  4:47
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Guitar – Masuo
Percussion – Mtume
Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Written-by, Saxophone [Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
A2. Sais  11:47
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Electric Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Guitar – Masuo
Saxophone [Soprano, Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
Written-by, Piano [Acoustic] – Mtume
A3. Notes For Eddie  7:49
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Guitar – Masuo
Percussion – Mtume
Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Written-by, Saxophone [Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
B1. God Bless’ The Child  5:37
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Guitar – Masuo
Percussion – Mtume
Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Saxophone [Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
Written-By – Herzog , Holiday
B2. Love Man  9:22
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Guitar – Masuo
Percussion – Mtume
Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Written-by, Saxophone [Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
B3. Good Morning, Heartache  8:18
Bass [Electric] – Bob Cranshaw
Drums – David Lee
Guitar – Masuo
Piano – Walter Davis Jr.
Saxophone [Tenor] – Sonny Rollins
Written-By – Fisher , Drake , Higginbotham
**

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Sonny ROLLINS – The Contemporary Leaders Plus 1958

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on December 15, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS – The Contemporary Leaders Plus 1958
1975 Issue.LAX 3021

Jazz

While the personnel on this release were leaders in their own right and contemporaries of Rollins in 1958, the title refers to the fact that the musicians were all recording with their own respective groups for the west coast Contemporary label at the time this album was made. The material is essentially standards, favorites of either the swing or the bop era. “How High The Moon” gets a trio treatment, with Rollins taking his time over the taut accompaniment provided by Kessel and Vinnegar; their bass and guitar given room to stretch out as well.

Hampton Hawes’ opening on “Alone Together” is lithe, muscular and spare. Rollins doesn’t even enter to solo until after choruses by Hawes and Kessell, giving things a friendly, jam-session atmosphere. Manne lays out on “In The Chapel In The Moonlight,” on which the tenorist waxes lyrical to the sure-footed, understated accompaniment of piano, bass and guitar. The presence of these layered, intriguing arrangements makes this record more than a simple all-star blowing date.
**
The last of the classic Sonny Rollins albums prior to his unexpected three-year retirement features the great tenor with pianist Hampton Hawes, guitarist Barney Kessell bassist Leroy Vinnegar and drummer Shelly Manne (all bandleaders for Contemporary Records during this era) on an unusual but inspired list of standards. Rollins creates explorative and often witty improvisations on such songs as Rock-A-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody, You, In the Chapel in the Moonlight and roaring versions of I’ve Found a New Baby and The Song Is You. Great music.
By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
Sonny Rollins- (Tenor sax)
Hampton Hawes- (Piano)
Barney Kessel- (Guitar)
Leroy Vinnegar- (Bass)
Shelly Manne- (Drums)
Victor Feldman- (vibes on 4, 5)
**
A1. I’ve Told Ev’ry Little Star  5:24
A2. Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Melody  4:50
A3. How High the Moon  7:45
A4. You  4:14
B1. I’ve Found a New Baby   3:35
B2. Alone Together  5:50
B3. In the Chapel in the Moonlight  6:40
B4. The Song Is You   6:10
**

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John COLTRANE – Four Tenors 1960 (AVI)

Posted in Ben WEBSTER, Charles LLOYD, JAZZ, John COLTRANE, MOVIES, Sonny ROLLINS on December 5, 2010 by whoisthemonk

John COLTRANE – Four Tenors 1960 (AVI)
Dvd 2003.

Jazz

All the master tenors that recorded for Jazz Casual on one single DVD. It includes performances in quartet of Coltrane, Webster, Rollins and Charles Lloyd, all of them joined by a stunning court of sidemen that includes McCoy Tyner, Jimmy Garrison, Elvin Jones, Vince Guaraldi, Jimmy Whiterspoon, Jim Hall, Bob Cranshaw, Ben Riley, Keith Jarrett, Ron McClure and Jack DeJohnette. Almost two hours of the best Jazz ever filmed. 20th Century.
**
John Coltrane, Ben Webster, Sonny Rollins and Charles Lloyd
This DVD is a collector’s edition of four 1960s television performances featuring John Coltrane, Ben Webster, Charles Lloyd (with Keith Jarrett) and Sonny Rollins.
**
John Coltrane Quartet (June, 1963):
John Coltrane- Tenor Saxophone;
McCoy Tyner- Piano;
Jimmy Garrison- Bass;
Elvin Jones- Drums.

Afro Blue  7:12
Alabama  5:55
Impressions  13:58
*
Ben Webster Quartet (1962):
Ben Webster- Tenor Saxophone;
Vince Guaraldi- Piano;
Monty Budwig- Bass;
Colin Bailey- Drums;
Jimmy Witherspoon- Vocals.

Times Getting Tougher  2:07
‘Tain’t Nobody’s Bizness  4:00
Cotton Tail  4:09
Chelsea Bridge  5:14
I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town  5:01
Roll ‘Em  1:56
Ben’s Little Scheme  2:39
*
Sonny Rollins Quartet (1962):
Sonny Rollins- Tenor Saxophone;
Jim Hall- Guitar;
Bob Cranshaw- Bass;
Ben Riley- Drums.

The Bridge  5:14
God Bless the Child  5:51
If Ever I Would Leave You  10:49
*
Charles Lloyd Quartet (1968):
Charles Lloyd- Tenor Saxophone;
Keith Jarrett- Piano;
Ron McLure- Bass;
Jack DeJohnette- Drums.

Love Ship  6:39
Tagore/Passing Through  20:14
Forest Flower  1:44
**

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Sonny ROLLINS – Love At First Sight 1980

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on December 5, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS – Love At First Sight 1980
M-9098

Jazz

More Sonny Rollins on Milestone–this time accompanied by some musicians with pretty weighty reputations of their own. Bassist Stanley Clarke contributes one of the compositions, as does pianist George Duke. Clarke and Rollins are also credited as co-writers on one of the album’s highlights, the closing duet “Double Feature,” a funky, slightly twisted blues that shows off Clarke’s prodigious technique to great advantage.

The loose half-time opening of “Strode Rode” gives way to a cooking set of solos, underpinned by Al Foster’s drums and Bill Summers’ congas. The set’s one standard, Ray Noble’s “The Very Thought of You,” gets a traditional, albeit drumless, treatment, with acoustic piano and electric upright letting Rollins thoughtfully explore the melody. Clarke’s “The Dream That We Fell Out Of” and Duke’s “Caress” provide various textural contrasts, with Rollins using multi-tracking to play both tenor and Lyricon on the Clarke tune.
**
Sonny Rollins- Tenor Sax, Lyricon
George Duke- Piano, Electric Piano
Stanley Clarke- Electric Bass
Al Foster- Drums (Tracks 1-3 & 5)
Bill Summers- Congas, Percussion (Tracks 1 & 5)
**
A1. Little Lu  6:38
A2. The Dream That We Fell Out Of  4:14
A3. Strode Rode  7:33
B1. The Very Thought Of You  5:38
B2. Caress  7:25
B3. Double Feature  4:51
**

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Sonny ROLLINS – The Solo Album 1985

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on November 21, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS – The Solo Album 1985
M-9137, CA 671

Jazz

Recorded live at the Museum of Modern Art, Sculpture Garden in the summer of 1985, this album captures Rollins performing an entire program of unaccompanied improvisation. For some, the rigors of an full-length album of spontaneous composition on solo saxophone may be a bit much. For fans of Rollins, the instrument or the art of extended improvisation however, the disc is a delight. It becomes an exhilarating exercise in concentration to follow the artist’s imagination as it whirls through the horn, plumbing its depths, bending its outer limits, flying through blinding glissandos and pulling out quotes to standards, children’s nursery rhymes and popular tunes like rabbits out of hats.
Like Coltrane, Rollins played his way through two worlds: the old school of allegiance to melody and song structure, and the postmodern realm of free-form invention. THE SOLO ALBUM weighs more heavily on the latter, as Rollins the songster is deconstructed and patchworked by Rollins the improviser in a process that is fascinating and inspiring to behold.
**
“The Solo Album” is a title to be taken quite literally when it comes to this 1985 release from the legendary sax master Sonny Rollins. The entire album is nearly an hours worth of unaccompanied solo tenor saxophone recorded live at New York’s Mueseum of Modern Art. While Sonny has recorded unaccompanied sax solos before, this is the first time he had done it on an entire album and I must say, the end result is stunning!! Throughout the album, we hear Sonny continually building up spontaneous inventions without ever running out of ideas. During these long improvisations, Sonny sometimes teases the audience by beginning to quote phrases from some well known pieces such as “Camptown Races”, “Mr. P.C.”, “The Star-Spangled Banner” and his own “Saint Thomas” before scurring back to a rapid flurry of notes and scales – sheets of sound.
This is indeed a great and unusual album from the great Sonny Rollins and I definitely recommend this to anyone wanting to learn about what real saxophone playing is. Here’s an hours-worth of sax and nothing but the sax from one its legendary innovators – the master Sonny Rollins.
By  Louie Bourland.
**
This recording is a dream come true for Sonny Rollins fans, as Rollins presents an entire program without accompaniment in what must have been the ideal setting of the Museum of Modern Art Sculpture Garden. As expected, Rollins drops allusions all over the place and spins core melodic ideas into extended variations. The real fun, though, is simply getting caught up in the inspired whirl of the Rollins imagination as it darts here and there, managing to be both coherent and unpredictable in a manner that has earned him recognition as the music’s supreme improviser. The enthusiastic audience, delighted to be along for the ride, even gets into the act at the close of this colossal solo session.
**

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Sonny ROLLINS Quintet – Rollins Plays For Bird 1956

Posted in JAZZ, Sonny ROLLINS on November 17, 2010 by whoisthemonk

Sonny ROLLINS Quintet – Rollins Plays For Bird 1956
1986 Issue.

Jazz

Recorded in 1956, the year after Charlie Parker’s death, ROLLINS PLAYS FOR BIRD consists primarily of a seven-song medley of tunes associated with Bird’s post-1950 period. In the course of referencing this repertoire, Rollins succeeds in paying …    Full Descriptiontribute to a great artist without descending into mere mockery. Bird’s playing was the definition of bebop phrasing and Rollins has moments here that are clearly quotations of the altoist’s rhythmic sensibilities. This is a carefully titled album, however: it’s not “Rollins Plays Bird,” but “Rollins Plays ‘For’ Bird.”

Anyone who wants reassurances of authenticity need only look to the sidemen credits. Trumpeter Kenny Dorham was on many of Bird’s own recordings, as was drummer Max Roach. Pianist Wade Legge and bassist George Morrow, while not Parker alumni, were working with Rollins, Roach, and Dorham in the Max Roach Quintet at the time of this session. “I’ve Grown Accustomed To Your Face” is a ballad feature for Rollins, while his original “Kids Know,” a cooking quintet tune in 3/4 time, provides conclusive proof that the tenorist was in full possession of his own voice on this date.
**
“Rollins Plays for Bird” is vintage Sonny Rollins, an album with the perfect combination of medium tempo hard boppers and scintilating ballads. But unlike other recordings you get them here all in one song. “The Bird Medley” features seven diiferent Charlie Parker songs, all strung together intelligently by the band of Sonny, Kenny Dorham, Wade Legge, George Morrow and Max Roach. While the medley is album’s focal point there are two other tracks, the eloquent ballad “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Your Face” and “Kids Know,” featuring terrific horn interplay by Sonny and Dorham. I have two small problems with the CD reissue however. First, “The House I Live In” should have been included here to complete this 10/5/56 session (see my review of “Sonny Boy” for more info). Second, “The Bird Medley” is all tracked as one song and it would have been very simple to split them up, or do that cool sub-track/suite thing some of my classical discs have. Other than that, this is a terrific CD, not quite up there with “Saxophone Colossus” and “Tenor Madness”
(also from ’56, a watershed year for Sonny), but it’s close.
By Michael B.Richman.
**
Sonny Rollins- Tenor saxophone
Kenny Dorham- Trumpet
Wade Legge- Piano
George Morrow- Bass
Max Roach- Drums
**
01. Medley; 26:52
I remember you
My melancholy baby
Old folks
They can’t take that away from me
Just friends
My little suede shoes
Star eyes
02. Kids Now 11:36
03. I’ve Grown Accustumed To Your Face 4:51
*

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